Page 42

drinks yearbook 2011

the advantages of the merger outweigh any disadvantages of the merger.” Liquor and grocery wholesaler Metcash revealed plans to purchase POS system provider Scanning Systems Australia (SSA), a company known for providing advanced electronic payment systems to independent retailers in a variety of sectors across grocery, liquor, hardware, fuel and convenience. The acquisition was arranged to take place later in the year, with existing working arrangements said to remain the same. It was a battle of iconic Aussie animals as Casella Wines, producer of yellow tail entered a logo battle with The Wine Group in March over the use of a kangaroo on the label of brand’s ‘Little Roo’ wine. John Casella, managing director of Casella Wines argued that American consumers would not be able to distinguish between the kangaroo used in The Wine Group’s brand and the wallaby used by the mega-selling Australian 40 | drinks yearbook wine brand. “It’s hard enough for consumers to make choices, let alone to be confused when they go into a store with a particular wine in mind,” he said. The Wine Group returned fi re, stating the wallaby cannot interchangeably be referred to as kangaroo. In an attempt to disrupt the Woolworths- Coles hegemony in liquor and grocery, German supermarket chain Aldi applied for the right to sell alcohol in all its 102 NSW stores. The retailer had been selling liquor in Victoria for seven years, offering around 70 varieties of non-refrigerated beer, wine and ready-to-drink spirits, most of which were Aldi branded products. March also saw Foster’s Group take a stand against Woolworths and Coles, following leaked plans to sell top selling brands such as VB, Carlton Draught and Pure Blonde below cost. According to Foster’s Group, who discontinued its beer supply to the chains, a signifi cant price reduction would damage the reputation of its brands. Spokesperson for the company, Troy Hey, said the decision was based on maintaining equity with their brands. “We are part of a great drinks industry and we want to build strong and lasting relationships with all retailers that respect our brands and build value,” he said. “We are acting legally on loss leading, not targeting any particular customer or brand, nor do we seek to prevent discounting of our products or to infl uence retail pricing.” An army of fake Jacob’s Creek wines reached bottle shops across the UK in April, revealed by incorrect spelling of the word ‘Australia’ on the label. Pernod Ricard UK, owner of Jacob’s Creek, launched an investigation after receiving a number of complaints from customers about the quality of the wine they had purchased. The fake wine was thought to be from China and was being sold to bottle shops and independent shops for around £2 ($A3). yellow tail was ranked as the most


drinks yearbook 2011
To see the actual publication please follow the link above