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drinks Yearbook 2010

drinks yearbook | 71 By the time that winter drew to a close, our country would have seen Prime Minister Kevin Rudd stand aside before a Labor Party ballot which propelled into power Julia Gillard as our fi rst ever female Prime Minister. By the end of August, a federal election campaign had been instigated at breakneck speed but following the 21 August election, we were left with a hung parliament for the fi rst time since 1940. Economic conditions, change of federal leadership - along with one of our coldest winters in years, all contributed to a decreased consumer confi dence amongst Australians. The Nielsen’s Global Online Consumer Survey for Quarter 1, 2010 (released in late July) revealed that while Australia continued to be one of the Top 10 most optimistic markets globally, our confi dence had slipped in the latest quarter as we continued to juggle rising interest rates, escalating debt levels, increasing utility costs, and economic uncertainty. This was all to have a signifi cant impact on the liquor industry throughout 2010 and as the dollar approached parity with the US dollar, exports were challenged. On home soil, the debate around binge drinking and the cost of alcohol-related harm to the community continued to swirl. In February, the (then) Prime Minister Kevin Rudd had announced on ABC’s Q&A program that he was personally in support of raising the legal drinking age to 21. By late November, New South Wales Premier Kristina Keneally in a Parliamentary seating announced that she’d like to see a public debate on the topic of raising the legal drinking age from 18 to 21. Calls for pub curfews continued around the country, encouraged by reports that alcohol-fuelled street violence had decreased in places such as Newcastle by 37 per cent, where a 3:30am ban was introduced in March 2008. The industry continued its commitment to its social responsibilities through a number of measures. In August, ALSA launched the ALSA Guide for Responsible Product Ranging Decisions to over 200 retailers. The Distilled Spirits Industry Council in autumn adopted a new set of standards to govern the way spirits are marketed, marking the fi rst time that an alcohol industry body had formalised a comprehensive set of guidelines that covered all areas of marketing. At the start of summer 09/10, Foster’s Group, Diageo, the Nine Network and Cricket Australia launched a new national community service broadcast campaign called ‘Know When to Declare’, asking fans to take responsibility for their actions and behaviour. The programme was repeated again in time for the summer 10/11 cricket season. DrinkWise built further on its ‘Kids and Alcohol Don’t Mix’ campaign, giving parents strategies and tips to delay their child’s introduction to alcohol. Jim Beam ran its ‘Where Do You Draw The Line’? campaign and introduced the concept to its NRL partners through TVCs and point-of-sale materials. Meanwhile, the National Alcohol Beverage Industry Council (NABIC) was forced to refute claims made in a Alcohol Education & Research Foundation report with claimed that alcohol abuse costs Australia $36 billion a year.


drinks Yearbook 2010
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