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drinks Yearbook 2010

drinks yearbook | 19 apparent reason”, said Terry Mott, LSA NSW CEO. In the weeks leading up to Boxing Day, a traditional trading day that packaged liquor retailers had enjoyed for over 40 years, LSA NSW assisted its members to apply for exemptions to trade - all were rejected by the OIR. Hundreds of bottle shops in Sydney, Newcastle and Wollongong were sent an email by New South Wales Police in the lead up to Australia Day, asking them not to sell most of their products, including full-strength beer, wine and spirits. Chief Inspector Guy Haberley sent out the email asking for bottle shops and pubs to refuse to sell drinks containing more than four per cent alcohol before 2pm. They also requested a ban on shots and double shots and the sale of some drink brands with more than fi ve per cent alcohol after 9pm. Under the Federal Government’s Award Modernisation process, obligations under the new National Retail Award came into effect on 1 January 2010, mostly relating to allowances, with signifi cant wage increases to come into effect from 1 July 2010. ALSA continued to challenge Fair Work Australia as the original penalties and rates would have seen around 12 – 15 per cent wage cost increases on stores in NSW, with varying impact on other states, in addition to annual infl ationary pressures arising out of future basic wage increases. In February, ALSA was very concerned about the impact on Australia’s retail liquor operators arising from the Federal Government’s Award Modernisation process. As a result of lobbying and information provided by and on behalf of ALSA, the National Retailers Association lodged an application to vary the new Award and some concessions were achieved which has resulted in around a 30 per cent reduction to the cost increase burden (resulting in a net impact of 8 – 11 per cent). While the outcomes did not deliver on the Federal Government’s promise that the award modernisation process would not result in labour cost increases, the decision reduced the expected additional labour cost burden to be imposed on employers by the new system. While Fair Work Australia agreed to phase in the new rates and penalties over fi ve years, depending on infl ation, the compound impact over that period could still be upwards of 20 per cent in some states. With staff costs and wages usually the most signifi cant overhead cost after rent – it was expected to put considerable pressure on many retailers.


drinks Yearbook 2010
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